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  • What Causes Pain Between The Shoulders And How To Fix It

    Pain between the shoulders is common: As many as one in 10 men and one in five women experience upper back pain, according to a 2015 journal article in Occupational Medicine[1]. Often, upper back pain between the shoulders is caused by a muscle strain due to overuse, injury or poor posture, and although the resulting discomfort can range from mildly uncomfortable to severe and debilitating, the root cause can often be corrected with a combination of rest, stretching and exercise.

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  • 8 Types of Shoulder Surgeries

    Shoulder surgery is often necessary for many common shoulder problems. Procedures can range from minimally invasive arthroscopic procedures to more traditional open surgeries using a scalpel and sutures.1 Arthroscopic surgery is a type of surgery where instruments are inserted through keyhole-sized incisions in your shoulder.

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  • Biceps Tendinitis: What Is It and What to Do About It

    Tendons are pieces of connective tissue that bind your muscles to bones. Like any part of the body, injury or overuse can lead to pain or inflammation in your tendons. This condition is called tendinitis. Biceps tendinitis is most often the result of everyday wear and tear on the muscle. In terms of sports, weightlifting is one of the high risk activities for biceps tendinitis, but this condition is a common sports injury that can happen to pros and amateurs alike.

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  • Hand, Wrist, And Arm Pain While Exercising

    Most exercise-related pain is dull and spreads over a larger area of your arms or legs. This is normal. When it seems to be sharp pain focused in one spot that you can pinpoint with a finger, it may indicate a muscle strain of a tendon inflammation. Popping, clicking, or grinding in the muscles or tendons are signs of strain.

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  • Everything You Need to Know About Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Your brachial plexus is a network of nerves in your shoulder that branches into five major nerves in each arm. It carries signals from your spinal cord to your arms and hands, allowing you to move your arm, hands, and wrists. Sensory skin nerves are also part of the brachial plexus and allow you to feel temperature and other sensations. There are several types of brachial plexus injuries, with many different causes. They also vary in severity, with some people healing completely on their own and others having permanent damage.

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  • Tennis Elbow: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

    Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is swelling, inflammation, and subsequent tearing of the tendons in your forearm.These tissues, which attach muscle to bone, can become overtaxed with repetitive use, causing an aching or burning pain that gets worse when you grip or lift something.

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  • What are muscle knots? An exercise physiologist explains what those tight little lumps are and how to get rid of them

    When your muscle gets damaged—even just a little—it can cause inflammation in the bands of muscle and the fascial layer above. And that clump of inflamed tissue is a myofascial trigger point. The little lumps are typically tender to the touch and can limit your range of motion or lead to pain during various movements.

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  • What Is a Torn Shoulder Labrum?

    To compensate for the shallow shoulder socket, the joint has a cuff of cartilage called a labrum that forms a cup for the end of the arm bone. When a patient sustains a shoulder injury, it is possible that the patient has a labral tear. The labrum also becomes more brittle with age and can fray and tear as part of the aging process.

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  • Wrist Pain Causes

    Wrist pain has a lot of possible causes, including a sprain, tendonitis, arthritis, and fractures. Some may heal with rest, while others may need treatment and/or be chronic issues that have the potential to cause long-term pain in the wrist.

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  • Jogging Past 40

    When your body's "age reminders" say it's time to change the way you exercise

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  • Females more likely to develop adhesive capsulitis

    Data showed that women develop adhesive capsulitis at a faster rate than men and that there are risk factors unique to women. Female athletes are also more likely to experience traumatic shoulder instability than male athletes.

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  • Overview of de Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a condition that causes pain associated with the movement of the thumb and wrist. The cause of the pain of de Quervain's is inflammation within a confined area around the base of the thumb.

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  • What to know about myofascial pain syndrome

    Myofascial pain syndrome is a chronic condition that affects the musculoskeletal system, including the bones, tendons, cartilage, ligaments, and connective tissue. Myofascial pain syndrome typically causes pain and tenderness in a specific area, such as the neck and one shoulder.

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  • Mayo Clinic Q and A: Help with sports injuries

    Young athletes get plenty of bumps and bruises, but how can they avoid injuries? Any advice on how long they should sit out before getting back on the field or in the game?

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  • Weekend warrior' exercise still lowers risk of premature death, says new research

    We're all told time and again just how important it is to exercise for good health. But with our busy schedules, finding the time to work out is often easier said than done. For many of us, the weekend is the only time we can get to the gym or go for a run. Debate is growing around the issue of whether or not you can still get the benefits of exercise if you squeeze it all in on a weekend (sometimes called "weekend warrior" exercise) instead of spreading it throughout the week. This is what a recent study sought to find out.

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  • Everything You Should Know About Swimmer's Shoulder

    According to the Cleveland Clinic, people who frequently swim are at risk of shoulder issues from overuse. In fact, 65% of swimmers experience a shoulder injury during their lifetime, but they are not the only ones.

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  • Why Does My Wrist Hurt?

    Wrist anatomy is complex, and finding the cause of your pain can be tricky. Wrist pain may feel sharp, dull, achy, or like pins and needles. Pain can occur when you bend your wrist forward, flex it backward, put pressure on it, or rotate it to turn a doorknob.

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  • Exercise therapy, corticosteroid injection improved management of Achilles tendinopathy

    Results showed a combination of exercise therapy and ultrasonography-guided corticosteroid injection was associated with improved outcomes in patients with long-standing Achilles tendinopathy.

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  • Athletes vs. Nonathletes: Who does better after hip arthroscopy?

    Athletes over the age of 40 have better outcomes after primary hip arthroscopy than nonathletes of the same age, according to new research.

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  • Causes of Wrist Cracking and Popping

    Popping and cracking in your wrist (also known as crepitus) can be an uncomfortable sensation that arises during many of your daily activities. Unfortunately, the origins of this joint noise are not always clear-cut.

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  • American Society for Surgery of the Hand
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • Health Influencer
  • American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery-Orthopaedic Surgery
  • American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery-Orthopaedic Surgery of the Hand
  • American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery-Orthopaedic Sports Medicine