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  • What to know about myofascial pain syndrome

    Myofascial pain syndrome is a chronic condition that affects the musculoskeletal system, including the bones, tendons, cartilage, ligaments, and connective tissue. Myofascial pain syndrome typically causes pain and tenderness in a specific area, such as the neck and one shoulder.

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  • Mayo Clinic Q and A: Help with sports injuries

    Young athletes get plenty of bumps and bruises, but how can they avoid injuries? Any advice on how long they should sit out before getting back on the field or in the game?

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  • Weekend warrior' exercise still lowers risk of premature death, says new research

    We're all told time and again just how important it is to exercise for good health. But with our busy schedules, finding the time to work out is often easier said than done. For many of us, the weekend is the only time we can get to the gym or go for a run. Debate is growing around the issue of whether or not you can still get the benefits of exercise if you squeeze it all in on a weekend (sometimes called "weekend warrior" exercise) instead of spreading it throughout the week. This is what a recent study sought to find out.

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  • Everything You Should Know About Swimmer's Shoulder

    According to the Cleveland Clinic, people who frequently swim are at risk of shoulder issues from overuse. In fact, 65% of swimmers experience a shoulder injury during their lifetime, but they are not the only ones.

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  • Why Does My Wrist Hurt?

    Wrist anatomy is complex, and finding the cause of your pain can be tricky. Wrist pain may feel sharp, dull, achy, or like pins and needles. Pain can occur when you bend your wrist forward, flex it backward, put pressure on it, or rotate it to turn a doorknob.

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  • Exercise therapy, corticosteroid injection improved management of Achilles tendinopathy

    Results showed a combination of exercise therapy and ultrasonography-guided corticosteroid injection was associated with improved outcomes in patients with long-standing Achilles tendinopathy.

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  • Athletes vs. Nonathletes: Who does better after hip arthroscopy?

    Athletes over the age of 40 have better outcomes after primary hip arthroscopy than nonathletes of the same age, according to new research.

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  • Causes of Wrist Cracking and Popping

    Popping and cracking in your wrist (also known as crepitus) can be an uncomfortable sensation that arises during many of your daily activities. Unfortunately, the origins of this joint noise are not always clear-cut.

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  • 12 causes of shoulder pain and treatment options

    Shoulder pain can range from mild to severe and can come on suddenly or build up over time. Shoulder pain causes include fractures, tissue inflammation or tears, joint or ligament instability, and arthritis.

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  • Seven tips for exercising safely during a heatwave

    When summer temperatures soar, the idea of working out might be the furthest thing from your mind. But just because it's hot doesn't mean you can't still squeeze a workout in if you want to, though there are a few adjustments you may need to make to your normal routine.

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  • Mayo Clinic Q and A: How are rotator cuff tears treated?

    There's a new minimally invasive treatment option that uses a balloon implant. How does this procedure work, and how does it compare to traditional treatments?

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  • A Complete Guide to Shoulder Surgery

    Shoulder surgery can potentially restore pain-free range of motion and full function to a damaged shoulder joint. Surgery is a treatment for a variety of conditions in your shoulder joint. These include rotator cuff tears, shoulder dislocations, and shoulder separations.

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  • Spin rate: Another benefit from Tommy John Surgery?

    Does Tommy John surgery change a pitcher’s spin rate, velocity, or whiff ratio? Turns out, according to a new study, Major League Baseball pitchers who undergo ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) do not experience any significant decreases in the spin rate, velocity, whiff rate, or hard-hit rate of 4-seam fastball, 2-seam fastball, or slider at 2 years after ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction—aka: Tommy John Surgery.

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  • When is the best time of day to exercise? The answer may be different for men and women

    Recent findings suggest that the effectiveness of exercise depends on the time of day (Exercise Time Of Day, ETOD). Now, a randomized controlled trial not only confirms convincingly that ETOD affects the effectiveness of exercise, but also shows that these effects differ between types of exercise, and between women and men.

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  • How Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Is Diagnosed

    If you have carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), then you may understand how the symptoms can affect your everyday work and recreational activities. The pain, tingling, and weakness in your hand or fingers may keep you from typing on your computer, writing, or holding items. And one of the most challenging characteristics of carpal tunnel syndrome: getting an accurate diagnosis.

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  • How to thaw a frozen shoulder

    Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, occurs when inflammation and scar tissue invade the shoulder joint. It can start with inflammation of the joint that leads to scarring, or in some cases the scarring happens with little inflammation.

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  • Return to competitive wrestling after ACLR high

    After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), return to sport is high in competitive wresting, according to a new study.

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  • The link between frozen shoulder and menopause

    There is no evidence of a direct link between frozen shoulder and menopause. However, menopause involves hormone changes that could contribute to frozen shoulder and other musculoskeletal conditions.

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  • MIS Achilles tendon repair superior to open repair

    Minimally invasive surgery is a safe and reliable technique for Achilles Tendon Repair, researchers of a new study contend.

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  • RSA is ‘safe and reliable’ for grade 3 or greater rotator cuff tears

    Outcomes and return to sport in patients with posterior-superior rotator cuff deficiency and related shoulder problems are better with reverse shoulder arthroplasty than other contemporary procedures, a presenter said.

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  • American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery-Orthopaedic Sports Medicine